Sip & Savor

Your Spoleto Intermission

As spring emerges in Charleston, the city awakens. Magnolias bloom, palmettos sway in warm breezes and friendly “hellos” follow you everywhere you go. One of the things that really makes spring in Charleston remarkable is the culture exhibited in The Spoleto Festival. For 17 days each spring, Charleston’s historic theaters, churches, and outdoor venues are filled with unique artwork and lively entertainment. The Spoleto Festival is a counterpart to the Festival dei Due Mondi (The Festival of Two Worlds) in Spoleto, Italy. When Italian organizers planned to expand their celebration to America, they looked for a city that was just as cultured and unique as Spoleto. These organizers were swept off their feet (and not by tripping on cobblestones!) by Charleston’s effortless charm and from there made Charleston the home of The Spoleto Festival.

While tickets for Spoleto can be purchased, several of the events are free, from outdoor concerts to live art auctions. And your fun doesn’t have to stop there! In between shows, take time to rest your feet, quench your thirst, and satisfy your hunger at the Thoroughbred Club. Tucked away in the lobby of Belmond Charleston Place, the Thoroughbred Club is a luxurious spot to enjoy the soulful sounds of live jazz while you and your friends cool down with refreshments, from well-crafted, original cocktails to fine wines.

The Thoroughbred Club not only has an award-winning drink menu, but they also have tapas that make for an excellent quick bite before the show. And with the Thoroughbred Club’s extensive menu, there is a little something for everyone.

The Sliders, a mini ‘21’ Burger with burgundy caramelized red onions and horseradish cream, can satisfy even the pickiest eaters.

For seafood lovers, the Seared Scallops with sweet and sour mushrooms and apple wood smoked bacon are a must have.

If you crave something fresh and light, indulge in the Summer Rolls, created with fresh vegetables in a rice paper with peanut sauce and chili jam.

Whichever snack you decide to fill yourself with before a Spoleto event, you are sure to be satisfied among friends and lively jazz at the Thoroughbred Club.

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Discovery

Walkable History: Charleston City Market

There are few cities in the world that have preserved their past quite like Charleston. History abounds on every street corner with beautifully maintained architecture from houses and churches to historic sites and museums. Tucked away gardens and antebellum plantations dot the city like intricate seashells.

Finding a historic attraction is about as easy as finding a courteous local with a penchant for holding doors open. So put away your map, guide book and iPhone, and strike out for the first street you come to. Let a true sense of adventure light your way.

Based in the center of the historic district, Charleston Place is the perfect location from which to relive Charleston’s rich history. In our “Walkable History” series, we’ll do just that, sharing our favorite spots to see history come alive in Charleston. All within a short stroll from the doors of the hotel.
Charleston City Market
Located directly across from the hotel’s Meeting Street entrance, you’ll find the Charleston City Market—a historically significant landmark dating back to 1788. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney ceded the land where the Market is built to the City of Charleston under the stipulation that the land would forever be used as a public market.

Construction was complete in 1807 and the buildings behind the Daughter’s of the Confederacy building were used to house meat, vegetable and fish markets. Butchers paid $2.00 for booth rental because the space was equipped with a marble slab to keep meat cold. Buzzards were nicknamed the “Charleston Eagle” because they were often found outside of the market begging for scraps.

Several years later the building was burned and not rebuilt until 1841. After the rebuilding, the market was used for Market Commissioner’s meetings, social functions and space rental underneath. Since 1970, the space has been used for arts, crafts and gourmet goods. The City Market saw it’s most recent renovation in 2011, enclosing the building and providing central heating and air.

While strolling the market you will find great shopping in booths such as the Charleston Angler, Gallery Chuma and The Historic Charleston Foundation. Restaurants such as Caviar and Bananas and Callie’s Hot Little Biscuit serve up delicious food and provide comfortable tables for weary shoppers. The Charleston City Market is a “must see” when visiting the city.

 

 

 

 

 

Photo credit: Charleston Museum Archives

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