Discovery, Wellness

Tee Off in Charleston

Charleston’s picturesque natural surroundings lend itself to truly great play. Year round, couples, families, and friends will each find the variety and challenging holes memorable and rewarding. With history of hosting 2012 and 2021’s PGA Tour, and the 2019 US Women’s Open, the Charleston area is the perfect golf getaway. From courses situated on breathtaking oceanfront terrain to wooded and marshland courses that highlight the Lowcountry, take aim at one of these Concierge recommended courses.

Wild Dunes Links or Harbor Course

On the northeast tip of the Isle of Palms, Wild Dunes is a unique barrier island resort golf facility 15 miles from downtown Charleston. Tom Fazio designed, and offering challenging links style play, the Links Course has been consistently ranked in the top 25 courses in the United States since its inception in 1977. Today, Fazio says it’s still among his favorites and he’s not the only one. From the rustling palms lining lush, rolling fairways to a finishing hole overlooking the glistening Atlantic Ocean, this is golf at its finest.

Stono Ferry

Set amidst Lowcountry breezes from the Intracoastal Waterway and centuries-old live oaks, Stono Ferry is a refuge from society’s hustle. This championship Ron Garl design offers one of the most exciting tests in all the Lowcountry. A semi-private club open to local and vacation play, wage your own war on the site of a historic Revolutionary War battle. Stono Ferry is 30 minutes from downtown Charleston.

Kiawah Island Golf Resort

Offering five distinct course experiences, Kiawah Island Golf Resort is home to the Ocean Course, site of the 2012 & 2021 PGA Championship. The Pete Dye designed course has a reputation as one of the toughest in the game, hosting the 1991 “War by the Shore” Ryder Cup. With a tranquil Lowcountry environment, a variety of courses, and a stunning clubhouse, Kiawah shouldn’t be missed.

Charleston National

This hidden gem is a Rees Jones designed championship golf course, and is open to the public year round. Offering an outstanding golf course, guest also receive access to the state-of-the-art practice facility and driving range, and the recently renovated Rees Jones pub. Rated by Golf Digest as the best non-resort golf course in the Charleston area, this course is less than 15 miles away.

RiverTowne Country Club

Located about 30 minutes from downtown, RiverTowne boasts an Arnold Palmer Masterpiece, awarded 4.5 stars by Golf Digest. The only Arnold Palmer course in the Charleston area, these scenic links are situated among marshlands and majestic live oaks with 13 holes alongside the Wando River and Horlbeck Creek. Amenities include a driving range and pro shop with PGA instruction plus a clubhouse serving fare daily.

Pack your clubs and take a trip to Charleston to experience some of the best courses in the country. Let our masterful concierge team arrange a golf excursion on one of these courses.

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Discovery

Portraits of Charleston: A Walk through History

Belmond has a collection of luxury hotels worldwide, including Belmond Charleston Place. In celebrating our distinctive city, we produced something that translates the spirit of the city into an authentic and meaningful experience. Belmond Charleston Place knew exactly how it would capture the essence of Charleston, through some of the city’s greatest and most influential people.

Charleston is one of the oldest cities in the South, filled with a rich and unique history dating back to the 1700’s. Since then, many great people have blessed Charleston with their presence and helped to shape it into the city we know and love today.

To spotlight just a few of the notable people who greatly enriched the Holy City, Belmond Charleston Place hotel showcases the portraits of legendary characters. While some of these well-known individuals are current Charlestonians, many lived long ago; but their mark on Charleston still remains.

The second floor is outlined with images of these historic figures. However, this “hall of fame” not only contains portraits, but also provides a way to experience that person’s history today. Booklets can be found alongside the display, which give detailed backgrounds on each individual and a way to celebrate that character in Charleston.

Just to name a few:

Thomas Pinckney (portrait right) was born in Charleston and fought in both the American Revolution and the War of 1812. An influential political figure, Pickney served as the 36th Governor of South Carolina. The statesman died in Charleston and is buried at St.Philip’s Episcopal Church.

Experience it today: You can visit Thomas Pinckey’s grave at St. Philips Episcopal Church. This historic church also houses the oldest congregation in South Carolina. And during the civil war, its bells were melted down into confederate cannons.

Pat Conroy was a New York Times best selling author and one of Charleston’s favorite sons. His best known novels included: The Great Santini, The Prince of Tides, and South of Broad. Conroy was a South Carolina Hall of Fame inductee and received the Order of the Palmetto, the state’s highest civilian honor.

Experience it today: See historic Charleston through the eyes of Conroy and the characters of his novel with a South of Broad walking tour by Old Charleston Walking Tours.

Septima Poinsette Clark (portrait bottom right), a Charleston native, was an educator, civil rights activist and has been called the “Grandmother of the American Civil Rights Movement.” Dealing with inequalities in the school system led her to become active in the movement for civil rights.

Experience it today: You can learn more about Clark’s struggle by visiting the Avery Reasearch Center for African-American History and Culture at the College of Charleston.

See these three figures and more on the 2nd Floor of Belmond Charleston Place and walk in the footsteps of Charleston’s most legendary individuals for yourself.

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Discovery

Holy City Churches

While most call our dear city Charleston, others prefer one of its nicknames, Chucktown. But for many, the historic Southern city is referred to by another name: the Holy City. In the 1600s, the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina guaranteed settlers religious liberty, making the city a safe haven for people from all over Europe trying to escape religious prosecution. Out of the 13 colonies, laws in the Carolinas guaranteed individuals the widest measure of religious freedom. Today, more than 400 churches with their majestic steeples dot the city skyline, proving Charleston to be a spiritual mecca for any and all to partake in.

Take a stroll down the cobblestone streets of the historic district and explore all the Holy City has to offer. Just make sure to look up.

Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church – 110 Calhoun Street

Throughout its lifetime, Mother Emanuel has been a place of worship intertwined with history. The oldest African Methodist Episcopal church in the South, the church was built in 1816 as a place of refuge for slaves and freedmen. From slave rebellions plotted in its sanctuary, to visits from civil rights icons such as Booker T. Washington and Martin Luther King Jr., Mother Emanuel has been a cornerstone in the black community locally and nationally. On June 17, 2015, nine parishioners were slain, but the church continues to remain a symbol of hope and strength.

Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim Synagogue – 90 Hassell Street 

Charleston is acknowledged as the birthplace of Reform Judaism in the United States. The city has the earliest documentation of Jewish people in the 1695 English settlement, and soon after, other Jews followed in pursuit of religious liberty in South Carolina. Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim Synagogue is the oldest synagogue building in continuous use in the United States and is also neighbors with Belmond Charleston Place. The colonnaded temple is renowned as one of the country’s finest examples of Greek Revival architecture, a National Historic Landmark, and can be found on the National Register of Historic Places. Belmond Charleston Place can book private tours upon request.

First Baptist Church – 61 Church Street

Founded in in 1682, this church is the first First Baptist church in the South. While the house of worship may be in pristine state today, it is not shy to damage and natural disasters. It has endured destruction during the Civil War, the cyclone of 1885, the earthquake of 1886 and Hurricane Hugo in 1989.
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church – 71 Broad Street

Standing on the site of the first Anglican Church south of Virginia, St. Michael’s Church was built in 1680, making it the oldest church building in the city. The large, long double-pew in the center of the church was originally known as ‘The Governor’s Pew,’ and it is the one in which President George Washington sat when he attended in 1791 and Robert E. Lee in 1861. Today, the church is considered a National Historic Landmark, and continues to represent Ecclesiastical Law as it resides in its prominent position at the ‘Four Corners of Law.

Circular Congregational Church – 150 Meeting Street

Featuring seven great doors and 26 windows, Robert Mills, Charleston’s leading architect, designed this Pantheon-type building in 1695. It is recognized on the National Register of Historic Places and as a National Historic Landmark. From its beginning the congregation challenged the established order, and this tradition has continued throughout their history. In the 1960s, the church took a stand for the integration of churches and in 2007, added a new “green” education building representing their commitment to environmental sustainability. The graveyard at the Circular Congregational Church is the city’s oldest burial grounds with monuments dating hundreds of years.
French Huguenot Church – 136 Church Street

Founded in 1681 by 45 French Huguenot refugees, the French Protestant Church of Charleston was the first of its kind in the Holy City. The Gothic Revival building features stucco over brick, ornamented with windows, buttresses, plus eye-catching decorative details. Truly, it is no wonder this church is found on the Historic National Register. While this architectural style was uncommon during the antebellum period in Charleston, the use of wrought iron and pink exterior reflects iconic Lowcountry charm. To this day, the French Huguenot Church is the only remaining independent Huguenot Church in the nation.

Explore the charming streets of Charleston and discover for yourself why it is called the Holy City.

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