A Symbol of Southern Hospitality

A leisurely stroll along any of the charming and historic streets of the Charleston peninsula lend the eye and ear many enchanting sights and sounds. Glances to the left and right can reveal hidden gardens filled with sweeping ivy and the gentle sound of bubbling fountains. And there is always the faint clip, clop of horse’s hooves on cobblestoned streets. If you look closely enough, you may notice that one symbol in particular seems to pop up quite often, the pineapple. This has become ubiquitous to the Charleston area, but few know what the tiny emblem actually represents.


Sprinkled all over downtown, pineapples can be spotted on doors, atop gates, adorning houses and even on some pieces of jewelry. So what’s the deal with these little fruits, and why are Charlestonians so obsessed with them? It’s because the pineapple has historically served as a symbol of Southern hospitality. According to Levins.com, pineapples were often the main attraction of the large and decadent centerpieces commonly found at extravagant Southern dinner parties. The fruit therefore came to represent the warmth of friendship that was shared at gatherings, as well as the prestige of being in attendance. Some Charlestonians will also tell you that pineapples use to be given as presents on someone’s doorstep, as a sign of friendship. As architects and dignitaries began to pick up on the symbol and what it represented, pineapples were soon incorporated into many of the architectural details in Charleston.


The history of the pineapple explains the popularity of one of the most iconic, photographed spots in town. Visit the Pineapple fountain at Waterfront Park while sightseeing, or after a lovely dinner, as it’s a treat to see any time of day. If you visit the park during daylight hours you can snap a picture of the Charleston harbor behind the fountain, and as soon as the sun sets you can behold the pineapple lit up and glowing against a gorgeous starlight sky. The fountain is a landmark for many visiting the Charleston peninsula, and is a must-see experience.

Copy of IMG_8554

One of the best ways to understand what the pineapple truly represents is to visit Charleston for yourself. The city is known for making visitors feel right at home with its hospitable charm, and the pineapple is just a token of this feeling. The next time you visit the Holy City, take some extra time to notice the cheery way that locals greet each other. Charlestonians pride themselves on being welcoming to all who visit, and that is one reason why those who have experienced Charleston say that it is unlike any other city. In fact, Charleston has been consistently ranked by Travel + Leisure as one of the friendliest cities in the United States.

Because of the unique history of the pineapple, visitors and locals alike have come to sport jewelry that features this Southern symbol. Whether it’s a commitment to being hospitable to all, or a charming reminder of time spent in the Holy City, people seem to love all that the pineapple represents. If you want to add a piece of pineapple jewelry to your collection, you won’t have to look too hard, just venture down King Street and visit the many boutiques which feature a variety of pineapple-inspired pieces. The charm pictured below can be purchased from Pandora in The Shops at Belmond Charleston Place.


The Palmetto Cafe at Belmond Charleston Place especially prides itself on being welcoming to guests who dine here. As a token of this sentiment, and as a delightful end to your delicious meal, guests are served a candied pineapple slice that has been dipped in milk chocolate. Hoping that each guest feels the warmth and hospitality of Charleston when they visit, this pineapple treat is the perfect end to an exceptional dining experience.

0 CommentsLeave a comment

Charleston’s Most Charming Theater

The Riviera Theater has remained a landmark building on lower King Street for years, welcoming visitors to utilize its renovated interior daily and lighting up the corner of King Street and Meeting Street nightly. Just like every building in the historic Holy City, the iconic Art Deco-style structure tells a unique story of its own. Before it housed business conventions, weddings and events, the venue served multiple purposes since its opening in January of 1939; from its beginning as one of Charleston’s first movie theaters to housing a Baptist Fellowship and a variety of business ventures in between.


At the time of its opening, the Riviera Theater was one of the most highly regarded auditoriums, complete with modern architecture and the latest projection equipment. Although it saw its fair share of success as one of only two theaters in downtown Charleston, the theater closed its doors in 1977 due to the rising popularity of television and the increasing construction of movie theatres in nearby suburbs.

Following its close as a theater, the building was then transformed into a church, housing a Community Baptist Fellowship for a short two years until the lease expired. The Riviera stood vacant again until 1983, when it opened briefly as a motion picture house featuring foreign and classic films. It closed again the following November and various plans were drafted for the space for several years.

When a group of developers were given preliminary approval by Charleston’s Board of Architectural Review to renovate the historic theater into a retail space, local neighbors were not particularly in agreement with the plans. Interest groups were formed and petitions were drafted to preserve the building’s architecture and history, which ultimately led to the purchasing of the theater by Charleston Place in 1993.


After a hefty four million dollar renovation by Charleston Place, the historic theater opened its doors on May 15th, 1997 as a conference center and event space. During the renovation, more than 90 percent of the original interior was preserved and other aspects were renovated to closely resemble the Art Deco design constructed by skilled architect Charles C. Benton in 1939. The interior decor also stays true to the Art Deco-style, from the intricate hand-painted crown molding to the original flexwood walls and the beautiful murals that adorn them. The marquee on the building’s exterior was also fully restored in the renovation process, containing 16,000 lights.

Today, the theater significantly resembles the charming, single-screen auditorium that King Street once knew, honoring the history of the building and the memories that were created there while continuing to serve the Charleston community. For more information regarding the the remarkable venue and its amenities, visit our website.

0 CommentsLeave a comment

Dancing Like A Local


From shagging on the beach to doing the Charleston by the Battery, the Lowcountry is the perfect setting for putting some swing in your step! It’s time to dust off your dancing shoes and learn about some of the Holy City’s most popular dances to avoid stepping on any feet at your next Southern soirée.

The Carolina Shag: A Southern Staple

Designated as South Carolina’s official State Dance in 1984, the shag is a six-count step dance typically done with a partner to the tune of beach music. The term was coined by cities along the South Carolina shore in the 1940’s and its dance moves descended from a dance called “Little Apple” which originated in Columbia, South Carolina. Shag dancing is one of the most casual dances, one that you can swing to on the beach without spilling your drink. When dressing for the occasion, keep it casual and stick to flip flops, button downs, khaki’s and skirts.

Concierge tip: Want to put your shagging skills to the test? Beginning in April, Charleston County Park and Recreation Commission hosts “Shaggin’ on the Cooper” at the Mount Pleasant Pier every Friday evening (pictured above).

The Charleston: A Piece of History

The Charleston, as presumed, coined its name right here in the Holy City. The fast-paced swing dance rose to fame after appearing in the Broadway musical “Runnin’ Wild” in 1923 and triumphed the Roaring Twenties, becoming one of the most popular dances at the time. The dance is accompanied by ragtime jazz music and is in quick four by four step counts with syncopated rhythms, incorporating quick feet movements and swaying arms. The Charleston can be done alone, with a partner or with a larger group, and the common attire is a suit for men and flapper-style dresses for women. Although the Charleston is not as common today, it remains a cultural trademark of the Jazz age in the Lowcountry and the flappers who so often danced the flamboyant movements to jazzy beats.

Practice your moves using these step-by-step videos for learning The Shag and The Charleston.


0 CommentsLeave a comment