Father’s Day Gift Guide

Every Father deserves a great gift, but they are often the hardest to shop for. From the boating island lifestyle dad, to the more practical, clean-cut man in your life; The Shops at Belmond Charleston Place have the perfect gift for yours. This Father’s Day, head to The Shops and snag one of these great gifts they have to offer.

Are you always left wondering at every holiday and birthday what to get the guy who has everything they need and more? Then add a little gift from The Art of Shaving into his everyday routine. They supply all of dad’s shaving essentials, from the basics to top of the line accessories that can add to his daily method. They are even equipped with a private treatment room so he can sit back, relax and enjoy without lifting a razor.

art-of-shaving

Most dads are guilty of a sweet tooth, and Godiva has all everything you need to help him indulge. From strawberries to pretzels to chocolate cigars, you’ll be his favorite child if one of these are in his gift basket. The chocolate cigars are always a top-seller, but this year is the last holiday they will be available. Treat dad to a cigar before the smoke clears.

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If your family is planning to celebrate on the water this Father’s Day, stop by Tommy Bahama for new swimwear and summer collars for dad. The relaxed fit and comfort of Tommy Bahama will add to his summer style and ensure he can take a break this weekend.

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What dad doesn’t love a comfortable pair of shoes? Sperry has a shoe fit for every man. Explore their nautical collections for boat-lovers, and the loafer style for a dad who is channeling summer on land this weekend.

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If you’re looking for a refreshing and masculine gift for dad, the L’Homme Gift Set by L’Occitane does all the shopping for you with just one stop. Dad’s favorite products, including shower gel and cologne are within the set, and will have him feeling refreshed and pampered on Monday morning.

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Don’t forget to seal the deal with a card. Dive into Papyrus‘ vast collection with every dad in mind to pair with your thoughtful gifts. Each card is unique in its own way, just like dad, and adds a creative touch to every gift.

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For more holiday and birthday gift ideas, stop by The Shops at Belmond Charleston Place or follow us on Instagram. The Shops are located on the lobby level of The Belmond Charleston Place hotel, along King, Meeting and Market Street.

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Your Guide to Charleston

Visitors to Charleston often remark on the historic district’s walkability yet many are surprised by the depth and breadth of the area’s offerings. One of the best ways to dive deeper in to the architecture, history and folklore of the region is with the help of a guide. From walking tours to carriage rides to sunset sails, our Concierge team recommends guests who are interested in experiencing the Holy City get up close and personal with the help of our favorite tour guides.

1670 Tours
A walking tour of Charleston’s residential district with 1670 Tours allows you to cover about 10-12 blocks with frequent stops at a casual pace. Tailored exclusively to the group, topics may include history, culture, architecture, wars and disasters. The licensed guides will lead you through private homes, public buildings, churches, gardens and graveyards, experiencing the ambiance of the various neighborhoods along the way. The tour features plenty of photo opportunities as well, and the guides know all the best Instagram-worthy spots.

1670 Tours

Schooner Pride
See Charleston from a different point of view on the Schooner Pride, a classic 84′ three mast wooden tall ship. Tour Charleston Harbor for an exhilarating day sail or set out at sunset for a romantic cruise around the peninsula. More of a leisurely sail than a tour, take in the peaceful waters of the Cooper River as it meets the Atlantic and mingle with dolphins, pelicans and gulls on the relaxing two-hour sail.

Schooner Pride

Carolina Polo and Carriage Company
Family owned and operated by Charlestonians whose families have been here since the 1600s, Carolina Polo and Carriage Company offers an authentic tour experience. The one-hour fully-narrated group carriage tour takes guests through the quaint and charming streets of downtown. The passionate and engaging guides will regale riders with history lessons, pirate’s tales and architectural highlights. Beautiful gardens and parks, stately mansions, historic churches and buildings are all included.

Carolina Polo and Carriage Company

For those hoping to mix learning with leisure on their upcoming Charleston visit, these tour guides offer a thorough glimpse into life in the historic district. Take some extra time to delve into a different view of the Holy City.

 

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Holy City Churches

While most call our dear city Charleston, others prefer one of its nicknames, Chucktown. But for many, the historic Southern city is referred to by another name: the Holy City. In the 1600s, the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina guaranteed settlers religious liberty, making the city a safe haven for people from all over Europe trying to escape religious prosecution. Out of the 13 colonies, laws in the Carolinas guaranteed individuals the widest measure of religious freedom. Today, more than 400 churches with their majestic steeples dot the city skyline, proving Charleston to be a spiritual mecca for any and all to partake in.

Take a stroll down the cobblestone streets of the historic district and explore all the Holy City has to offer. Just make sure to look up.

Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church – 110 Calhoun Street

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Throughout its lifetime, Mother Emanuel has been a place of worship intertwined with history. The oldest African Methodist Episcopal church in the South, the church was built in 1816 as a place of refuge for slaves and freedmen. From slave rebellions plotted in its sanctuary, to visits from civil rights icons such as Booker T. Washington and Martin Luther King Jr., Mother Emanuel has been a cornerstone in the black community locally and nationally. On June 17, 2015, nine parishioners were slain, but the church continues to remain a symbol of hope and strength.

Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim Synagogue – 90 Hassell Street 

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Charleston is acknowledged as the birthplace of Reform Judaism in the United States. The city has the earliest documentation of Jewish people in the 1695 English settlement, and soon after, other Jews followed in pursuit of religious liberty in South Carolina. Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim Synagogue is the oldest synagogue building in continuous use in the United States and is also neighbors with Belmond Charleston Place. The colonnaded temple is renowned as one of the country’s finest examples of Greek Revival architecture, a National Historic Landmark, and can be found on the National Register of Historic Places. Belmond Charleston Place can book private tours upon request.

First Baptist Church – 61 Church Street

First Baptist
Founded in in 1682, this church is the first First Baptist church in the South. While the house of worship may be in pristine state today, it is not shy to damage and natural disasters. It has endured destruction during the Civil War, the cyclone of 1885, the earthquake of 1886 and Hurricane Hugo in 1989.

St. Michael’s Episcopal Church – 71 Broad Street

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Standing on the site of the first Anglican Church south of Virginia, St. Michael’s Church was built in 1680, making it the oldest church building in the city. The large, long double-pew in the center of the church was originally known as ‘The Governor’s Pew,’ and it is the one in which President George Washington sat when he attended in 1791 and Robert E. Lee in 1861. Today, the church is considered a National Historic Landmark, and continues to represent Ecclesiastical Law as it resides in its prominent position at the ‘Four Corners of Law.’

Circular Congregational Church – 150 Meeting Street

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Featuring seven great doors and 26 windows, Robert Mills, Charleston’s leading architect, designed this Pantheon-type building in 1695. It is recognized on the National Register of Historic Places and as a National Historic Landmark. From its beginning the congregation challenged the established order, and this tradition has continued throughout their history. In the 1960s, the church took a stand for the integration of churches and in 2007, added a new “green” education building representing their commitment to environmental sustainability. The graveyard at the Circular Congregational Church is the city’s oldest burial grounds with monuments dating hundreds of years.

French Huguenot Church – 136 Church Street

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Founded in 1681 by 45 French Huguenot refugees, the French Protestant Church of Charleston was the first of its kind in the Holy City. The Gothic Revival building features stucco over brick, ornamented with windows, buttresses, plus eye-catching decorative details. Truly, it is no wonder this church is found on the Historic National Register. While this architectural style was uncommon during the antebellum period in Charleston, the use of wrought iron and pink exterior reflects iconic Lowcountry charm. To this day, the French Huguenot Church is the only remaining independent Huguenot Church in the nation.

Explore the charming streets of Charleston and discover for yourself why it is called the Holy City.

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