An Evening at the Theatre

Now that the hustle and bustle of the new year is settling down, it’s the perfect time to dress up, hit the town and treat yourself to a night out. Charleston’s vibrant and robust theatre scene is a great way to celebrate the coming year. From grand auditoriums to comedic hot spots, this coastal town offers a big city level of limelight options.

Gaillard Center

Gaillard Center Charleston

If you’re looking for a grandiose experience that will stun your senses with some of the best artistic performances, look no further than the Gaillard Center. This immense, newly renovated 1,800-seat auditorium is the cultural center of Charleston and offers a wide range of shows from classical ballet and opera to modern dance. Perhaps the most iconic performance location in Charleston, Gaillard Center serves as the premiere venue for the world-renowned Spoleto Festival USA and the Charleston Symphony Orchestra.

Theatre 99

Theatre 99 Charlesotn

If grand opera and folks in tights aren’t your thing, venture to Theatre 99 to enjoy some comedy gold. As Charleston’s best place for stand up comedy and improv, this comedic enclave will have your rolling on the floor laughing as you experience some of the South’s top talent. If you’re looking to take a step out of your comfort zone or even brush up on your comedy skills, visit during the daytime for one of Theatre 99’s improv training classes.

PURE Theatre

Pure Theatre Charleston

You’ve tried the grand concert halls. You’ve had your go at the comedy troupes. You want something edgier; more modern. PURE Theatre has what you’re looking for. This reputable King Street Theatre showcases a strong ensemble of 13 professional actors that emphasize provocative, contemporary performances. Their focus on risk-taking and passionate commitment on the stage sets them apart.

Dock Street Theatre

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For those who want more than just a wonderful performance, why not visit the oldest theatre in the country? Dock Street Theatre, which has graced Charleston’s historic French Quarter neighborhood since 1736, showcased the nation’s first opera performance, Flora, and continues to wow audiences today. With its beautiful wooden auditorium, wrought iron balcony and sandstone columns, it regularly features one of Charleston’s most reputable acting troupes, the Charleston Resident Acting Company. The theatre displays a wide range of events from musicals to plays. The newly renovated bar and outdoor patio also offer a great spot to socialize during intermission.

Since the 18th century, Charleston has been considered one of America’s premiere cultural centers, combining the magnificent splendor of its European influencers with the boldness and individualism of the American spirit. Today, that heritage remains and is personified in its diverse and blossoming theatrical culture. Make it a night out to truly remember and enjoy a luxurious meal with live jazz at the Charleston Grill after the performance.

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Downtown Discovered: The French Quarter

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Downtown Charleston, also known as the Historic District, offers a host of smaller neighborhoods within the city center, each with a unique personality and experience for visitors. Our previous post in this series had us exploring picturesque South of Broad and now the French Quarter, also known as the Art District, beckons.

Location:
Named the French Quarter in 1873, the area is roughly bordered by Market Street to the north, Broad Street to the south and extends from the Cooper River westward to Meeting Street. Most of the French Quarter is located within the area that comprised the original colonial walled city of Charles Town, the only walled city built by the English in North America.

Concierge Tip: The only above-ground portion of the city’s earliest defenses still visible is located on the site of the Old Powder Magazine, Located on Cumberland Street, this National Historic Landmark was completed in 1713 and housed the community’s store of gunpowder. Open Monday-Saturday for tours.

History:
The name “French Quarter” was derived in the 1800s when preservation efforts began to protect warehouse buildings on the Lodge Alley block, largely occupied by French Merchants. Local vendors also sold their wares, including meat, vegetables and fish, at the city market. Built between 1804 and 1830, the land was ceded to the city by Charles Cotesworth Pinckney for the express use that it remain as a public market for perpetuity. The current Market Hall was erected in 1841, after the previous building was destroyed by fire. Recognized as one of the oldest in the country, the Charleston City Market is a beloved institution for locals and visitors, especially since it’s home to more than 50 sweetgrass basket weavers who carry on this Lowcountry tradition.

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Concierge Tip: Following a $5.5 million makeover, the City Market now houses vendors and food purveyors. Grab lunch and then make your way down Church Street. One of the most photographed spots in the city, St. Philips Episcopal Church is home to the oldest congregation in the state of South Carolina. Notice the church’s foundation in the middle of Church Street. Locals say that the church was built this way so that even if you were not a believer, when you rode down Church Street you had to acknowledge the presence of God. Also worth a visit are the Circular Congregational Church and the French Huguenot Church, the only such congregation in the United States, both located on Meeting Street.

Places of Interest:
While the historic French Quarter is small, art and culture abound. The first building in the country designed for theatrical use, the Dock Street Theater, is located on Church Street. First opened in 1736, the theater still produces performances every year. The area is also home to numerous art galleries. Spend the afternoon browsing Gallery Row, located on Broad Street before visiting those located on Church and State Streets. Currently closed while it undergoes a multimillion dollar renovation, the Gibbes Museum of Art is slated to reopen in the spring of 2016 with a renewed focus on American Southern art.

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Concierge Tip: Our restaurants, The Palmetto Cafe and Charleston Grill, are filled with art by local artists, included notable painter Robert Lange. Lange’s studio is open daily, and private tours can be arranged here and at a variety of other studios. If you find yourself here on the first Friday of March, May, October or December, enjoy the French Quarter Art Walk which is free and open to the public. Galleries open their doors for patrons to mingle with artists over refreshments. Stroll among gas lit lanterns and discover the works of more than 500 artists of various styles and mediums.

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